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USGS SIR [Scientific Investigation Reports]

 

SIR 2004-5043 / De Hay, K. L. / HYDROLOGY AND GROUNDWATER QUALITY IN THE MINE WORKINGS WITHIN THE PICHER MINING DISTRICT, NORTHEAST OKLHOMA 2002-2003, 2004, pb, 62 pages, 24 figs., 4 tables, $ 24 [The Picher mining district of northeastern Ottawa County, Oklahoma, was a major site of mining for lead and zinc ores in the first half of the 20th century. The primary source of lead and zinc were sulfide minerals disseminated in the cherty limestones and dolomites of the Boone Formation of Mississippian age, which comprises the Boone aquifer. Ground water in the aquifer and seeping to surface water in the district has been contaminated by sulfate, iron, lead, zinc, and several other metals. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality, investigated hydrology and ground-water quality in the mine workings in the mining district, as part of the process to aid water managers and planners in designing remediation measures that may restore the environmental quality of the district to pre-mining conditions

SIR 2005-5251 / Pope, L. M. / ASSESSMENT OF CONTAMINATED STREAMBED SEDIMENT IN THE KANSAS PART OF THE HISTORIC TRISTATE LEAD AND ZINC MINING DISTRICT, CHEROKEE COUNTY, KANSAS, 2005, pb, 61 pages, 16 figs., 12 tables, $ 24  [The Tri-State Mining District in parts of southeast Kansas, southwest Missouri, and northeast Oklahoma was the primary source of lead and zinc ore in the world for much of its 120-year history. Commercial mining in the Kansas part of the Tri-State Mining District began in the mid-1870s and lasted until 1970.


SIR  2008-5140 / Kleeschultz, M. J., Ed. / HYDROLOGIC INVESTIGATIONS CONCERNING LEAD MINING ISSUES IN SOUTHEASTERN MISSOURI, 2008, pb, 238 pages, 41 figs., 22 tables, $ 24  [Lead and zinc mining along the Viburnum Trend Subdistrict of southeastern Missouri has occurred for more than 40 years. Additional potentially exploitable deposits have been discovered 30 miles to the south, within the Mark Twain National Forest. It is anticipated that the observation of current (2008) geohydrologic conditions in the Viburnum Trend can provide insight to land managers that will help reasonably anticipate the potential mining effects should additional mining occur in the exploration area.   The purpose of this report is to present a compilation of previously unpublished information that was collected as part of a larger multidisciplinary study of lead mining issues in southeastern Missouri. The report resulted from the application of a multidisciplinary approach to investigate current hydrologic and biologic conditions in streams of the Viburnum Trend and the exploration area in the Mark Twain National Forest.


SIR 2009-5032 / Andrews, W. J., et.al. / SELECTED METALS IN SEDIMENTS AND STREAM IN THE OKLAHOMA PART OF THE TRISTATE MINING DISTRICT 2000-2006, 2009, pb, 36 pages, 18 figs., 7 tables, $ 24  [The abandoned Tri-State mining district includes 1,188 square miles in northeastern Oklahoma, southeastern Kansas, and southwestern Missouri. The most productive part of the Tri-State mining district was the 40-square mile part in Oklahoma, commonly referred to as “the Picher mining district” in north-central Ottawa County, Oklahoma. The Oklahoma part of the Tri-State mining district was a primary producing area of lead and zinc in the United States during the first half of the 20th century. Sulfide minerals of cadmium, iron, lead, and zinc that remained in flooded underground mine workings and in mine tailings on the land surface oxidized and dissolved with time, forming a variety of oxide, hydroxide, and hydroxycarbonate metallic minerals on the land surface and in streams that drain the district.


SIR 2004-5043 / De Hay, K. L. / HYDROLOGY AND GROUNDWATER QUALITY IN THE MINE WORKINGS WITHIN THE PICHER MINING DISTRICT, NORTHEAST OKLHOMA 2002-2003, 2004, pb, 62 pages, 24 figs., 4 tables, $ 24 [The Picher mining district of northeastern Ottawa County, Oklahoma, was a major site of mining for lead and zinc ores in the first half of the 20th century. The primary source of lead and zinc were sulfide minerals disseminated in the cherty limestones and dolomites of the Boone Formation of Mississippian age, which comprises the Boone aquifer. Ground water in the aquifer and seeping to surface water in the district has been contaminated by sulfate, iron, lead, zinc, and several other metals. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality, investigated hydrology and ground-water quality in the mine workings in the mining district, as part of the process to aid water managers and planners in designing remediation measures that may restore the environmental quality of the district to pre-mining conditions


SIR 2016-5120 / Hildreth, W. and Fierstein, J. / LONG VALLEY CALDERA LAKE AND REINCISION OF OWENS RIVER GORGE, 2016, pb, 68 pages, 26 figs., 1 table, $ 24  [
Owens River Gorge, today rimmed exclusively in 767-ka Bishop Tuff, was first cut during the Neogene through a ridge of Triassic granodiorite to a depth as great as its present-day floor and was then filled to its rim by a small basaltic shield at 3.3 Ma. The gorge-filling basalt, 200 m thick, blocked a 5-km-long reach of the upper gorge, diverting the Owens River southward around the shield into Rock Creek where another 200-m-deep gorge was cut through the same basement ridge. Much later, during Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 22 (~900–866 ka), a piedmont glacier buried the diversion and deposited a thick sheet of Sherwin Till atop the basalt on both sides of the original gorge, showing that the basalt-filled reach had not, by then, been reexcavated. At 767 ka, eruption of the Bishop Tuff blanketed the landscape with welded ignimbrite, deeply covering the till, basalt, and granodiorite and completely filling all additional reaches of both Rock Creek canyon and Owens River Gorge. The ignimbrite rests directly on the basalt and till along the walls of Owens Gorge, but nowhere was it inset against either, showing that the basalt-blocked reach had still not been reexcavated. Subsidence of Long Valley Caldera at 767 ka produced a steep-walled depression at least 700 m deeper than the precaldera floor of Owens Gorge, which was beheaded at the caldera’s southeast rim. Caldera collapse reoriented proximal drainages that had formerly joined east-flowing Owens River, abruptly reversing flow westward into the caldera. It took 600,000 years of sedimentation in the 26-km-long, usually shallow, caldera lake to fill the deep basin and raise lake level to its threshold for overflow. Not until then did reestablishment of Owens River Gorge begin, by incision of the gorge-filling ignimbrite.


SIR 2016-5144 / Smith, D. S. / OCCURRENCE, DISTRIBUTION, AND VOLUME OF METALS-CONTAMINATED SEDIMENT OF SELECTED STREAMS DRAINING THE TRI-STATE MINING DISTRICT, MISSOURI, OKLAHOMA, AND KANSAS, 2011-2012, 2016, pc, 86 pages, 32 figs., 8 tables, $ 24  [Lead and zinc were mined in the Tri-State Mining District (TSMD) of southwest Missouri, northeast Oklahoma, and southeast Kansas for more than 100 years. The effects of mining on the landscape are still evident, nearly 50 years after the last mine ceased operation. The legacies of mining are the mine waste and discharge of groundwater from underground mines. The mine-waste piles and underground mines are continuous sources of trace metals (primarily lead, zinc, and cadmium) to the streams that drain the TSMD. Many previous studies characterized the horizontal extent of mine-waste contamination in streams but little information exists on the depth of mine-waste contamination in these streams. Characterizing the vertical extent of contamination is difficult because of the large amount of coarse-grained material, ranging from coarse gravel to boulders, within channel sediment.]



End of USGS SIR Reports



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